Biology2018-04-18T08:17:40+00:00

Biology

Faculty 
Virginia Ann Dell, Ph.D. (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) , University of Oklahoma
Health Science Center
Mark Y. Li, Ph.D. (Reproductive Physiology and Endocrinology), Iowa State University
Brent Richards, Ph.D. (Neuroscience), Georgetown University
Amy Roberson, Ph.D. (Cell Biology), University of Oklahoma Health Science Center

Biochemistry | One semester (1/2 unit of credit)
This elective course provides a detailed study of biological molecules including their structure, properties, nomenclature, and function. The course will also investigate the role these molecules have in metabolic reactions, equilibria and other biological processes. Laboratory investigations will emphasize methods of separating and identifying biomolecules and their components.

Prerequisites:  General Chemistry II. Student may opt to take this course for either Biology or Chemistry credit. It is also a prerequisite for Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Endocrinology One semester (1/2 unit of credit)

This is an advanced human biology course. The objective is to provide a concise, yet systematic account of the endocrine system, its hormones, glands, and target tissues. Emphasis will be placed on current advances of scientific research in the field. The study of this course will serve as a gateway to
further studies and possibly an eventual entry into a health care related field.

Prerequisites: Human Anatomy and Physiology or Molecular and Cellular Biology and one year of Chemistry.

Genetics | One semester (1/2 unit of credit)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of genetics. We will discuss classical Mendelian inheritance patterns, as well as the relationship between genes and traits. We will learn about how genes function and how they are controlled and regulated. Finally, we will discuss the nature of genetic variation and how it contributes to the variation of populations of organisms and their long-term evolution.

Prerequisites: General Biology or equivalent

General Zoology | One semester (1/2 unit of credit)

This course is an introduction and overview of the animal kingdom. It begins with the basic principles of biology including cell biology, genetics and evolution and how animals fit into the bigger picture of the living world. It then covers important adaptations of major animal groups with focus on how these features can be used to study ancestry and phylogeny.

Prerequisites: General Biology or equivalent

Human Anatomy and Physiology | One semester (1/2 unit of credit)

This course will present a survey of the structure and function of the human body. The student will examine both the gross and microscopic anatomy of these structures and study their functions. Dissection is an integral part of the anatomy laboratory work and the functional aspects will be examined using laboratory procedures that include computer-driven experiments. Students will gain a basic understanding of the structure and function of the human body, relate the classroom knowledge to some real life experiences and clinical abnormalities, and develop some lab skills and research ability through lab exercises and a term paper project.

Prerequisites: General Biology or equivalent

Human Embryology | One semester (1/2 unit of credit)

The class offers students an opportunity to appreciate the wonder and intricacy of the development of a human being from a single cell (zygote) at molecular, cellular, genetic and anatomical levels. Emphasis is placed on basic developmental principles and mechanisms of normal developmental processes, although some congenital malformations will be discussed. A lab session will be scheduled during a lecture period which will includes the observation of slides of embryonic structures and the experiment of in vitro fertilization using sperm and eggs from live sea urchins.

Prerequisites: Human Anatomy and Physiology

Introduction to Neuroscience | One semester (1/2 unit of credit)

An introduction to the basics of nervous system function and dysfunction, this course begins with the cellular and molecular biology of neurons and glial cells. This includes an explanation of action potentials and synaptic transmission. We then discuss how the brain receives and processes sensory information and how it acts on that information through the motor systems. It ends with an overview of more complex mental function including language and memory.

Prerequisites: Human Anatomy and Physiology or equivalent

Molecular and Cellular Biology | One semester (1/2 unit of credit)

The focus of this course will be the cell, its structure and function at the molecular level. This course will include topics in cellular metabolism, chromosome structure, genes, and regulation of cellular function. Laboratory with experiments in molecular biology techniques is integrated into the course.

Prerequisites: Biochemistry

Microbiology | One semester (1/2 unit of credit)

This course will allow the student an appreciation of organisms that are invisible to the unaided eye. Through lecture and laboratory, the student will become familiar with the basic principles and terminology of microbiology. Topics covered in the lecture portion will include bacterial structure, genetics, metabolism, and environmental microbiology. Laboratory exercises will emphasize procedures and techniques used to study these organisms.

Prerequisites: This course is generally reserved for senior enrollment.

Plant and Soil Science | One semester (1/2 unit of credit)

This course teaches students about the form and function of plant systems. Lessons throughout the course will provide an overview of the field of agricultural science with a focus on plant science. Students will be immersed in inquiry-based exercises that teach them plant concepts through laboratory and practical experiences. Topics will include plant anatomy, physiology, cytology, reproduction and taxonomy, as well as soils and the fundamentals of production and harvesting.

Prerequisites: General Biology or equivalent.

Plant and Soil Science | One semester (1/2 unit of credit)

This course teaches students about the form and function of plant systems. Lessons throughout the course will provide an overview of the field of agricultural science with a focus on plant science. Students will be immersed in inquiry-based exercises that teach them plant concepts through laboratory and practical experiences. Topics will include plant anatomy, physiology, cytology, reproduction and taxonomy, as well as soils and the fundamentals of production and harvesting.

Prerequisites: General Biology or equivalent.